PARP in Breast Cancer
CME Dinner Symposium
Friday, June 1
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-9:00PM
Hilton Chicago
International Ballroom South
(Second Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • Which patients will benefit from PARP inhibition strategies
  • How data presented in Chicago can change your daily practice
  • Management techniques for PARP-associated toxicities

Overview:

A great deal of progress has been made in understanding the mechanistic underpinnings for the use of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor therapy in the treatment of patients with breast cancer. As evidence continues to accumulate, it is important to be able to apply clinical data to the development of treatment paradigms that maximize outcomes for your patients. This includes efficacy considerations, as well as the development of strategies to identify and mitigate predictable treatment-related adverse events (TRAEs) in a timely fashion.

To help you optimize the management of your patients with breast cancer, we have developed an exciting, interactive educational activity that will highlight the latest clinical evidence pertaining to the use of PARP inhibitors. The format will include a combination of didactic presentations and brief panel discussions framed by clinically applicable case presentations. There will also be multiple opportunities for you to present questions to the panel of clinical experts.

Program Chair:

Mark E. Robson, MD
Attending Physician
Clinical Genetics & Breast Medicine Services
Clinic Director, Clinical Genetics Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, NY

This activity is supported by an educational grant from AstraZeneca
CAR T-Cell Therapy
CME Dinner Symposium
Friday, June 1
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-9:00PM
Hilton Chicago
Salon A 1 & 2
(Lower Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • How to select eligible patients for CAR T-cell therapy
  • Clinical data that is changing treatment paradigms
  • Addressing cytokine-release syndrome and other toxicities

Overview:

The recent approval of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells has given even patients with highly chemorefractory hematologic malignancies additional treatment options. While these new therapies hold the promise of benefit for an expanding number of patients, becoming familiar with new therapeutic modalities can be very challenging for busy clinicians. We would like to help you to develop familiarity and competency with CAR T cells, which may offer the chance to improve outcomes for your patients. CAR T cells differ from traditional systemic therapies with respect to patient selection, manufacture, and treatment administration. To that end, we have developed an exciting educational opportunity for you to further enhance your skills on the frontlines of cancer care.

This symposium will provide you with the opportunity to learn from an expert panel of physicians in a dynamic setting. We have created a format that features both didactic and interactive panel discussions to help illustrate the application of clinical data in real-world patient care scenarios.

Program Chair:

Andre H. Goy, MD, MS
Chairman and Executive Director
Lymphoma Division Chief - John Theurer Cancer Center
Chief Science Officer - RCCA
Lydia Pfund Chair for Lymphoma
Professor of Medicine, Georgetown University
Hackensack, NJ

This activity is supported by educational grants from Celgene Corporation and Kite, A Gilead Company.
Immunotherapeutic Strategies in Genitourinary Cancers
CME Dinner Symposium
Friday, June 1
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-9:00PM
Hilton Chicago
Williford Room
(Third Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • Which patients should receive checkpoint inhibitors or may benefit from participation in a clinical trial
  • Strategies to mitigate Immune-related adverse events (irAEs)
  • Clinical impact of new data presented in Chicago

Overview:

Unmet clinical needs remain in the management of genitourinary (GU) cancers, particularly for your patients with advanced forms of these tumors. As the field of immunotherapies rapidly advances, you face challenges in ensuring the provision of cutting-edge care to manage these most difficult-to-treat forms of cancer.

At this live CME satellite symposium, presented as an ancillary event to the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting, you will hear a renowned panel of GU cancer experts discuss and highlight the emerging data for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), advanced bladder cancer, prostate cancer, and including less-common but important malignancies such as testicular cancer and penile cancer. Through interactive case discussions, data presentations, question-and-answer sessions, and the always popular Medical Crossfire®, you will have direct access to expert guidance on the interpretation of core concepts in an effort to forecast future application of evolving strategies for clinical practice.

Program Chair:

Charles G. Drake, MD, PhD
Professor of Oncology and Immunology
Director, Genitourinary Cancer Program
Co-Director of the Immunotherapy Program
Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
Columbia University Medical Center
New York, NY

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.
IO in Advanced cSCC
CME Dinner Symposium
Saturday, June 2
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-9:00PM
Hilton Chicago
International Ballroom South
(Second Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • The benefit of immunotherapy in advances or metastatic cSCC
  • Recently reported date that will change clinical practice
  • Multidisciplinary approaches to improve outcomes for your patients
  • Application of new cSCC data presented in Chicago

Overview:

Current treatment response rates in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) are suboptimal, with a minority of patients experiencing complete or partial response with present pharmacologic treatment options. Moreover, surgeries to remove cSCC tumors can be disfiguring, and your elderly patients often are not candidates for chemotherapeutic agents because they cannot tolerate the toxicities. There is clearly an unmet clinical need for improved cytoreductive strategies that may mitigate deleterious surgical outcomes in these treatment settings for your patients.

In this program, you will hear expert faculty discussing advances in immunotherapies for the treatment of advanced or metastatic cSCC, including how to translate the most recent data sets to your clinical practice, and how you can improve your role in personalized, multidisciplinary, teambased patient management. You will also learn strategies for cementing best practices for the mitigation and proactive management of treatment-related adverse events In particular, experts will provide you clinical context concerning noteworthy evidence in cancer immunotherapy, their take on how this impacts care of your patients, and how to safely apply these novel approaches.

Program Chair:

Jason Luke, MD, FACP
Assistant Professor of Medicine
The University of Chicago Medicine
Chicago, IL

This activity is supported by educational grants from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi Genzyme.
Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma
CME Dinner Symposium
Saturday, June 2
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-9:00PM
Hilton Chicago
Salon A 1 & 2
(Lower Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • The relevance of biology to mRCC treatment decisions
  • What drives decision to switch RCC therapy
  • How to manage toxicities for patients with RCC

Overview:

Clinical decision-making in the setting of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has dramatically changed over the past few years. Recent and pending approvals of new agents and combinations, as well as expanded indications, have raised questions about how rational treatment planning can be used to match the most optimal strategy to the patient. At the same time, accumulating real-world experience with newer agents and emerging trial data continue to refine state-of-the-art care is in RCC. The management of metastatic clear cell RCC (ccRCC) continues to evolve, with multiple treatment options available for patients who relapse following adjuvant surgical and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy.

This activity is designed to address your key questions related to RCC management via discussion of data and real-world patient cases by a multidisciplinary faculty of internationally recognized experts in RCC. Adverse event management and future directions in the field will also be addressed and considered throughout the program in the context of the program theme, to help you individualize patient care. Foremost, this program aims to provide you with cutting-edge, practical guidance that can be applied immediately to your clinical practice.

Program Chair:

Toni K. Choueiri, MD
Director, Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology
Director, Kidney Cancer Center
Senior Physician, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Jerome and Nancy Kohlberg Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA

This activity is supported by educational grants from Exelixis, Inc and Prometheus Laboratories Inc.
PARP Ovarian
CME Dinner Symposium
Sunday, June 3
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-9:00PM
Hilton Chicago
International Ballroom North
(Second Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • The utility of PARP inhibition in ovarian cancer
  • How to improve patient outcomes with data from Chicago
  • Adverse event management PARP inhibitor treatment

Overview:

Multiple poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been approved for both treatment and ongoing maintenance indications following the results of recent key studies. These approvals have heralded an opportunity to significantly improve outcomes for your patients. It can be difficult for any clinician to keep up with the accelerated pace and volume of clinical advancements associated with PARP inhibition, and we would like to present an opportunity to help you stay current and arm yourselves with the clinical knowledge and insight necessary to optimize safety and efficacy outcomes for your patients.

We have developed an educational activity that will feature a panel of experts in the management of ovarian cancer who will present and assess the latest data on PARP inhibition and the clinical implications of the data for your practice. Medical Crossfire® format for this symposium is ideally suited for you to consider expert perspectives on key learning points pertaining to the use of PARP inhibition in ovarian cancer. During this case-based activity, clinical scenarios will be presented that explore nuances of patient care that may enhance your own practice. Decisions that are made in real-world clinical scenarios are not always clearly demarcated by clinical trial data, and this activity will give you the chance to hear how the experts substantiate their decision making when multiple treatment options may be viable.

Program Chair:

Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS
Professor & Executive Director, Cancer Network Research
Ann Rife Cox Chair in Gynecology
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, TX

This activity is supported by educational grants from AstraZeneca, Clovis Oncology, Myriad Genetics Laboratories, and Tesaro Inc.
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
CME Dinner Symposium
Sunday, June 3
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-9:00PM
Hilton Chicago
International Ballroom South
(Second Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • Understand the rationale for targeted and immunotherapy strategies
  • How emerging data will potentially change treatment paradigms
  • Effective treatments when curative therapy isn't an option

Overview:

Historically, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been associated with poor outcomes, in large part due to the few effective treatment options available for patients who are ineligible for treatment with curative intent. However, recent approvals and emerging resection or liver transplant strategies for HCC are transforming care and improving patient outcomes. Are you ready to incorporate new approaches and information into your practice?

This program is designed to help you assess the latest available safety and efficacy data related to the care of your patients with HCC. At this lively, interactive, case-based symposium, a panel of renowned experts in HCC treatment will guide you through an exploration of evidence-based rationales for choices at key decision points along the disease continuum. You will get an up-close look at how the faculty leverage key data sets to support decision making on treatment initiation, sequencing, monitoring, and switching, as well as adverse event management.

Program Chair:

Alan P. Venook, MD, FASCO
Madden Family Distinguished Professor in Medical Oncology and Translational Research
Shorenstein Associate Director, Program Development
Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, CA

This activity is supported by medical education grants from Eisai, Inc. and Exelixis, Inc.
Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Adjuvant Setting
CME Dinner Symposium
Sunday, June 3
Registration & Dinner:
6:30PM-7:00PM
Program:
7:00PM-8:30PM
Hilton Chicago
Salon A-5
(Lower Level)
720 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60605

What you'll learn:

  • The impact of recent data on current sequencing paradigms
  • Single agent and combination strategies in the adjuvant setting
  • How to weigh toxicity management with treatment selection

Overview:

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been one of most difficult-to-treat of the solid tumors, and more recently, one of the most rapidly evolving fields in oncology. New data suggest impending changes to your practice in both early-stage and metastatic RCC, including novel indications, combination approaches, and optimized adjuvant strategies. The use of adjuvant therapy for RCC remains a hot topic for which high-quality, well-coordinated, multidisciplinary care is of utmost importance to achieving optimal outcomes in the perioperative setting for your patients with RCC.

In this program, a multidisciplinary panel of renowned experts in RCC will guide you through an in-depth, up-to-date review of risk assessment in the early stage RCC setting, patient selection for adjuvant systemic therapy, evidence from clinical studies of adjuvant therapy for RCC, and overall multidisciplinary care planning. To help you apply this information and to provide you with opportunities to interact with the faculty and each other, this activity includes case-based discussions and a Medical Crossfire® debate on key areas of controversy and clinical uncertainty concerning the use of adjuvant therapy for RCC.

Program Chair:

Robert A. Figlin, MD, FACP
Steven Spielberg Family Chair in Hematology Oncology
Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Director, Division of Hematology Oncology
Deputy Director, Integrated Oncology Service Line
Deputy Director, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, CA

This activity is supported by an educational grant from Pfizer Inc.